Primary Sjögren's syndrome is associated with significant cognitive dysfunction


Tezcan M. E. , KOÇER E. B. , HAZNEDAROĞLU Ş., Sonmez C., Mercan R., ATAK YÜCEL A., ...More

International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases, vol.19, no.10, pp.981-988, 2016 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 19 Issue: 10
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Doi Number: 10.1111/1756-185x.12912
  • Title of Journal : International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases
  • Page Numbers: pp.981-988
  • Keywords: anti-glutamate-receptor antibody, cognitive functions, neurobehavioral manifestations, Sjogren's syndrome, SYSTEMIC-LUPUS-ERYTHEMATOSUS, D-ASPARTATE RECEPTOR, NEUROLOGICAL MANIFESTATIONS, ANTIGANGLIOSIDE ANTIBODIES, ITALIAN PATIENTS, COHORT, INVOLVEMENT, ANTI-GM1, CRITERIA, DISEASE

Abstract

© 2016 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, LtdAim: Cognitive dysfunction is a neurologic manifestation in primary Sjögren syndrome (PSS). On the other hand, several antibodies are related to cognitive dysfunction. The aim of this study is to assess the cognitive dysfunction of PSS patients via detailed neurologic tests. Moreover, its associations with antibodies were also evaluated. Method: Twenty-eight female patients with PSS and 17 healthy controls comprised the study groups. Short-term memory, long-term memory, verbal learning, visual memory, visual spatial perception, attention, verbal frequency function, executive functions and information processing speed were evaluated with neurologic tests in both of the study groups. Furthermore, anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) type anti-glutamate-receptor antibody, anti-ribosomal-p and antiganglioside antibodies were assessed in the study groups. Results: The attention, data processing speed, verbal learning, short-term verbal memory and visuo-spatial perception performances were lower in the patients with PSS when compared to the healthy controls. The difference reached statistical significance in Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (P < 0.01), Serial Digit Learning Test (P < 0.01), clock drawing (P = 0.03), Auditory Verbal Learning Test immediate verbal memory (P = 0.01) and Benton Judgement of Line Orientation Test (P = 0.03). Even if antiganglioside antibodies were more likely to be present in the PSS group when compared to the healthy controls, no relationship was found between its positivity and cognitive dysfunction. Conclusion: Results of this study suggest that cognitive dysfunction is quite prevalent in PSS patients without being associated with studied antibodies.