Viburnum opulus: could it be a new alternative, such as lemon juice, to pharmacological therapy in hypocitraturic stone patients?


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TUĞLU D. , Yılmaz E., Yuvanc E., Erguder I., Kisa U., Bal F., ...More

Archivio italiano di urologia, andrologia : organo ufficiale [di] Società italiana di ecografia urologica e nefrologica / Associazione ricerche in urologia, vol.86, no.4, pp.297-299, 2014 (Journal Indexed in ESCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 86 Issue: 4
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Doi Number: 10.4081/aiua.2014.4.297
  • Title of Journal : Archivio italiano di urologia, andrologia : organo ufficiale [di] Società italiana di ecografia urologica e nefrologica / Associazione ricerche in urologia
  • Page Numbers: pp.297-299
  • Keywords: Viburnum opulus, Hypocitraturic, Urinary stone, Lemon juice

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Citrate, potassium, and calcium levels in Viburnum opulus (V. opulus) and lemon juice were compared to evaluate the usability of V. opulus in mild to moderate level hypocitraturic stone disease.MATERIALS AND METHODS: V. opulus and lemon fruits were squeezed in a blender and 10 samples of each of 100 ml were prepared. Citrate, calcium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, and pH levels in these samples were examined.RESULTS: Potassium was found to be statistically significantly higher in V. opulus than that in lemon juice (p = 0.006) whereas sodium (p = 0.004) and calcium (p = 0.008) were found to be lower. There was no difference between them in terms of the amount of magnesium and citrate.CONCUSIONS: Because V. opulus contains citrate as high as lemon juice does and it is a potassium-rich and calciumand sodium-poor fluid, it can be an alternative to pharmaceutical treatment in mild-to-moderate degree hypocitraturic stone patients. These findings should be supported with clinical studies.