Rhinoscintigraphic analysis of nasal mucociliary function in patients with Bell's palsy


Boynuegri S., ÖZER S., Peksoy I., Açikalin A., Tuna E., Dursun E. , ...More

Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice, vol.19, no.3, pp.359-363, 2016 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 19 Issue: 3
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Doi Number: 10.4103/1119-3077.179287
  • Title of Journal : Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice
  • Page Numbers: pp.359-363
  • Keywords: Bell's palsy, mucociliary transport, rhinoscintigraphy, CLEARANCE FUNCTION, SYSTEM

Abstract

© 2016 Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow.Objective: Mucociliary transport (MCT) is an important defense mechanism of the respiratory tract. One of the major factors determining MCT is the ciliary activity of the respiratory epithelium. Rhinoscintigraphy is the most commonly used method for the analysis of mucociliary activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of facial paralysis on the nasal mucociliary clearance. Materials and Methods: This study included 38 Bell's palsy patients as the study group and 10 subjects without any history of paranasal sinus disease or facial paralysis as the control group. A drop of technetium 99m-labeled macroaggregated albumin (Tc-99m MAA) was placed posterior to the head of the inferior turbinate and followed with a gamma camera. MCT rate was measured as the velocity of Tc-99m MAA drop. Results: The mean MCT rate was 4.27 ± 0.76 millimeters per minute (mm/min) on 20 sides of 10 healthy controls, 4.11 ± 2.91 mm/min on the affected sides of the patients with Bell's palsy, and 6.03 ± 3.13 mm/min on the nonparalyzed sides of the patients. MCT rate was statistically significantly faster in the nonparalyzed side when compared to the paralyzed side in Bell's palsy patients (P = 0.001). MCT rates were not significantly different in the control group and paralyzed sides of the Bell's palsy patients (P = 0.810). The MCT rate was statistically significantly faster in the nonparalyzed sides of Bell's palsy patients when compared to the controls (P = 0.017). Conclusion: This study showed a faster MCT rate on the nonparalyzed side in Bell's palsy patients when compared to the paralyzed side and the control subjects. A compensatory mechanism could be the underlying reason for faster MCT on the nonparalyzed side. Further studies on larger patient groups are needed to investigate the effect of facial paralysis on the MCT and changes of facial nerve function on the opposite, nonparalyzed side of the face.