Effects of computer use on upper limb musculoskeletal disorders and function in academicians


SARI M., ÜNVER B., KILINÇ H. E., TUNÇ A. R., BEK N.

International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, 2024 (SSCI) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Publication Date: 2024
  • Doi Number: 10.1080/10803548.2024.2349408
  • Journal Name: International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics
  • Journal Indexes: Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), Scopus, Academic Search Premier, PASCAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, INSPEC, MEDLINE, Civil Engineering Abstracts
  • Keywords: academician, computer use, musculoskeletal disorders, upper limb function
  • Lokman Hekim University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Objectives. This study aimed to investigate the effects of academician’s demographic characteristics and computer usage habits on upper limb musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and function. Methods. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted with 100 academicians. Data were collected using questionnaires, which included the patient-rated wrist evaluation questionnaire–Turkish version (PRWE-T), the Cornell musculoskeletal discomfort questionnaire–Turkish version (CMDQ-T), the upper extremity functional index–Turkish version (UEFI-T), demographic characteristics and average daily computer usage time. Results. A low-level significant correlation was found between the age of the individuals and the CMDQ-T forearm (p = 0.044; r = 0.202) and CMDQ-T wrist (p = 0.001; r = 0.337) scores. Women had higher CMDQ-T neck scores and lower UEFI-T scores than men (p < 0.05). Academicians who used computers for 6 h a day or more had higher PRWE-T and CMDQ-T neck, shoulder, upper arm and forearm scores, and had a lower UEFI-T score (p < 0.05). Conclusion. Neck, shoulder, upper arm and forearm symptoms were higher and upper extremity function was impaired in academicians who used computers for 6 h a day or more. Besides, gender and age were associated with upper limb MSDs and function, but occupation duration did not affect those outcomes in academicians.