Electrophysiological basis of metabolic-syndrome-induced cardiac dysfunction


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Okatan E. N. , Durak A. T. , TURAN B.

Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, vol.94, no.10, pp.1064-1073, 2016 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 94 Issue: 10
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Doi Number: 10.1139/cjpp-2015-0531
  • Title of Journal : Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology
  • Page Numbers: pp.1064-1073
  • Keywords: SERCA, heart function, calcium sparks, calcium transients, insulin resistance, high sucrose diet, diabetes, SARCOPLASMIC-RETICULUM FUNCTION, VENTRICULAR DIASTOLIC DYSFUNCTION, IMPAIRED SERCA FUNCTION, CONTRACTILE DYSFUNCTION, INSULIN-RESISTANCE, CARDIOMYOCYTE DYSFUNCTION, DIABETIC CARDIOMYOPATHY, RYANODINE RECEPTOR, OXIDATIVE STRESS, HEART-FAILURE

Abstract

© 2016, Canadian Science Publishing. All rights reserved.Myocardial contractility is controlled by intracellular Ca2+ cycling with the contribution of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of altered SR function in defective regulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels in rats with metabolic syndrome (MetS) induced by a 16-week high-sucrose drinking-water diet. Electric-field stimulated transient intracellular Ca2+ changes in MetS cardiomyocytes exhibited significantly reduced amplitude (~30%) and prolonged time courses (2-fold), as well as depressed SR Ca2+ loading (~55%) with increased basal Ca2+ level. Consistent with these data, altered ryanodine receptor (RyR2) function and SERCA2a activity were found in MetS cardiomyocytes through Ca2+ spark measurements and caffeine application assay in a state in which sodium calcium exchanger was inhibited. Furthermore, tetracaine application assay results and hyperphosphorylated level of RyR2 also support the “leaky RyR2” hypothesis. Moreover, altered phosphorylation levels of phospholamban (PLN) support the depressed SERCA2a-activity thesis and these alterations in the phosphorylation of Ca2+-handling proteins are correlated with altered protein kinase and phosphatase activity in MetS cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, MetS-rat heart exhibits altered Ca2+ signaling largely due to altered SR function via changes in RyR2 and SERCA2a activity. These results point to RyR2 and SERCA2a as potential pharmacological targets for restoring intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and, thereby, combatting dysfunction in MetS-rat heart.