QT dispersion in single coronary artery disease: is there a relation between QT dispersion and diseased coronary artery or lesion localization?


Tikiz H., Terzi T., Balbay Y., DEMİR A. D. , Soylu M., Keles T., ...More

Angiology, vol.52, no.1, pp.43-51, 2001 (Peer-Reviewed Journal) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 52 Issue: 1
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Doi Number: 10.1177/000331970105200106
  • Journal Name: Angiology
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded, Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.43-51

Abstract

It has been shown that QT dispersion (QTD) increases during episodes of myocardial ischemia or infarction. However, no extensive data on the relation between the diseased coronary artery or the localization of stenosis and the QTD are available. The aim of the study was to examine the relation between QTD and diseased coronary artery and lesion localization during exercise stress test in patients with single coronary artery disease without prior myocardial infarction. One hundred nineteen patients with single coronary artery disease and 53 patients with normal coronary arteries were enrolled in study. All patients underwent exercise stress test with modified Bruce protocol, and QT interval parameters were measured at rest and at minute 2 of the recovery (rec-2) period. QT dispersion at rest was found higher in all single-vessel disease groups compared with that in the control group, and corrected QT dispersion at rec-2 period was also markedly higher in left anterior descending, circumflex, and right coronary artery groups compared with that in the control group. No relation was found between QT dispersion and diseased coronary artery or the lesion localization. In conclusion, no qualitative difference was found between QT dispersion and diseased coronary artery or proximal or distal lesion localization. However, it was observed that patients with single-vessel disease had wider baseline QT dispersion as compared with that in the control group, which further increased significantly with exercise. This finding supports the idea that severity of localized ischemia rather than extent of coronary artery disease would be expected to have a greater effect on inducible QT dispersion.©2001 Westminster Publications, Inc.